New Academic Year 2018

The 2018 academic year has just begun.

Piao Hui-san (formerly a research student) and Wang Yifan-san have joined our Doctoral course. Koichiro Watanabe-san and Yichen Yao-san have joined our Masters course. Piao Hui-san, Wang Yifan-san, and Koichiro Watanabe-san are affiliated with the Graduate School of Education. Yichen Yao-san is affiliated with the Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies.

Professor Dr Yuko Yoshida of the University of Tsukuba, who supported our research and education for four years as Visiting Professor, resigned on 31 March 2018, and Professor Bin Umino of Toyo University became Visiting Professor on 1 April 2018. Dr. Hideto Kazawa, Engineering Manager at Google, has joined our lab as visiting researcher of the Interfaculty Initiative in Information Studies.

In Japan, the very foundation of public administration is breaking down after a series of document tampering scandals came to light, many of which suggest a connection to the Prime Minister. The stability and openness of public documents – and more generally, free access to information – is one of the important conditions for a free and democratic society. Professor Lawrence Lessig states as follows in his book Free Culture:

We take it for granted that we can go back to see what we remember reading. Think about newspapers. If you wanted to study the reaction of your hometown newspaper to the race riots in Watts in 1965, or to Bull Connor’s water cannon in 1963, you could go to your public library and look at the newspapers. Those papers probably exist on microfiche. If you’re lucky, they exist in paper, too. Either way, you are free, using a library, to go back and remember—not just what it is convenient to remember, but remember something close to the truth.

It is said that those who fail to remember history are doomed to repeat it. That’s not quite correct. We all forget history. The key is whether we have a way to go back to rediscover what we forget. More directly, the key is whether an objective past can keep us honest. Libraries help do that, by collecting content and keeping it, for schoolchildren, for researchers, for grandma. A free society presumes this knowledge. (p. 109)

Those who have looked at the research topics of the course members may think that a very small number of research topics are related to libraries (our course is the Library and Information Science course).

At least for now in Japan, libraries still maintain their mission and status, i.e. to support a free and democratic society (although we are observing some unfortunate cases due to “outsourcing”). In history, however, institutions that were called “libraries” or their equivalent did not necessarily have such a mission. Some “libraries” enclosed knowledge and contributed to the authoritarian arrangement of societies.

Research topics pursued in our course, including those that are not directly related to libraries, have an important trait in common: they are all related to the environment and conditions which enable free access to the records of knowledge by everyone, which in turn constitutes a part of the infrastructure for a free and democratic society. This is the very ideal which all real-world libraries (are supposed to) share.

Suppose that a public library, in order to attract customers and make money, started putting most of its resources into collecting and displaying Dorcus hopei binodulosus, Lyophyllum decastes, and Calocybe gambosa. In that case, we could no longer regard it as a library, even if it was still called a library. For libraries to be libraries, there is an ideal that they need to maintain … and nurture.

That is, to record and arrange the best of human knowledge produced, often at great cost, so far in human history, in such a way that it can be shared by everyone and is handed over to future generations.

In order to go to the moon, it is not enough to look up at the moon and appreciate it; we need to develop rocket engines. The tasks of keeping, realising, and widening the ideal behind and embodied in modern libraries vary widely.

For all those who think seriously about and truly desire the realisation of freedom and democracy, and a society in which individuals are respected, you are with us and we are with you.

2018年度

2018年度になりました。

博士課程に朴恵さんと王一凡さんが入学しました(朴さんは研究生でした)。修士課程に渡邊晃一朗さんと姚依辰さんが入学しました。朴さん・王さん・渡邊さんは教育学研究科、姚さんは情報学環・学際情報学府の所属です。

4年間にわたり客員教授として研究教育にご尽力くださった吉田右子先生が2018年3月31日付で客員を退任しました。4月1日からは東洋大学の海野敏先生が客員教授となりました。また、Googleの賀沢秀人さんが本研究室情報学環の客員研究員となりました。

日本では、公文書改ざん問題で、行政の基盤が揺らいでいます。自由な社会・民主的な社会の必要条件の一つに、情報へのアクセスがあります。LessigのFree Cultureから、図書館と自由な社会に関連する部分を引用します。

私たちは、読んだと記憶しているものを、立ち戻って再び見ることができる状況を当然と思っている。・・・公共図書館で新聞を見ることができる。・・・いずれにせよ、図書館を使って、自由に/無料で、過去のものを思い起こすことができる。

歴史を記憶しないものはそれをくり返す、と言われる。これは正しくない。我々は誰もが歴史を忘却する。重要なのは、忘れたことを立ち戻って再発見する方法があるかどうかである。・・・図書館は、コンテンツを集めて維持することで,それを行う。・・・自由な社会はこの知識を前提とする。

メンバーの研究テーマをご覧になった方は、本研究室が「図書館情報学研究室」でありながら、図書館「そのもの」に関わる研究テーマが少ないと思われるかもしれません。

現在、日本では図書館は(最近の「アウトソーシング」により不幸な例外も出てきていますが)、概ね、自由な社会を支える基盤としてそれなりの位置付けを保っています。けれども、それぞれの社会の中で「図書館」と呼ばれている/呼ばれてきた組織が常に/すべてそのような位置付けを担ってきたか、というと必ずしもそうではありません。「図書館」が権威主義的に知識を囲い込む役割を担ってきた時代や地域がありました/す。

本研究室の研究テーマは、直接、現在の日本や様々な地域で「図書館」と言われている現実の組織に関わらないものも含め、いずれも、自由で民主的な社会の基盤となる、知識の記録に誰もがアクセスできることを可能にする環境と条件に関わるという共通点をもち、それらはすべて図書館の理念に関わっています。

公共図書館が、利用者を増やすためにオオクワガタとハタケシメジとユキワリの展示を始めて、それにばかり予算と人員を注ぎ込んだら、公共図書館という名前が付いていたとしても、それは図書館とはもう言えません。図書館と名の付いた組織が図書館であるためには、維持しまた展開しなくてはならない理念があります。

人類が、様々な苦しみをときに伴いながらも培ってきた、普遍的に共有すべき、自由と民主的な社会を支える知識と知見の最良の部分に関する記録を、保存し、すべての人に利用可能なかたちで編成し、また次の世代が引き継いでいけるようにすること。

月に到達するためには月を見上げるばかりでなく下を向いてロケットエンジンを作ることが必要です。近代の図書館が担ってきた理念を維持し、現実のものとし、広げていく作業は、多岐にわたります。

今年度も、どうぞよろしくお願いいたします。

表現の自由と図書館に関する公開講演会

日時:2017年12月18日(月)13:00-15:30
場所:東京大学・教育学部第一会議室
講師:藤田早苗氏(エセックス大学ロースクール・人権センター・フェロー)
講演タイトル:「国際社会から見た日本の表現の自由」
概要:
近年日本の表現の自由について、国連人権機関から懸念が表明されるようになってきた。昨年は表現の自由に関する国連特別報告者デビッド・ケイ氏が訪日調査を行い、先日行われた人権理事会の普遍的定期的審査でも勧告が出されている。講演者はケイ氏の調査を支援し、人権機関への情報提供も続けてきた。それらの経験に基づき国際社会による日本の人権特に表現の自由の評価や日本の国連人権機関への対応について紹介する。
参加費:無料
言語:日本語
主催:東京大学・図書館情報学研究室